Kick Start Spring with Seeds

I’m a New Englander who doesn’t put away the winter gear until May (you just never know), so in April, I get antsy.

Come on, spring, I want to yell! It’s time to arrive! I’m sick of boots, heavy coats, and mittens; I want green! I want the flowers and trees in my yard to grow! Yet April resists my entreaties, and I’m forced to continue to wait, wait, wait…it truly is the cruelest month.

But this year, thanks to a little help from some friends, spring arrived early—on my kitchen counter.

Seeds_Red_Shutters

The folks at Stonyfield and High Mowing Organic Seeds offered their help to start our backyard garden (my husband’s pride and joy), sending us seeds to grow ruby red chard, sweet peppers, sweetie tomatoes, and eggplant. Alas, the ground was still frozen, so it was too early to get our garden underway. But I had a number of empty Stonyfield yogurt containers in our recycling bin, which gave me an idea.

welcome_springI decided to begin our garden inside, using those containers to kick start spring. This is such an easy idea that I can’t believe I hadn’t thought of it sooner!

All I did was save some yogurt containers from the recycling, wash them out so every bit of the yogurt was gone, and wait for a day when we had enough sun to make working outside fun for everyone. A rare, warm afternoon in April arrived, and the kids and I headed out to our compost pile (the only place that wasn’t frozen) to find dirt to fill each container. We carefully placed the seeds in the dirt and moved the containers to our kitchen counter. There, we checked the containers daily, waiting excitedly for progress. We were rewarded last week when small green sprouts pushed through the dirt, their heads curved inward, searching for the sun.

This weekend, now that yellow daffodils and purple hyacinths have bloomed throughout my neighborhood (finally!), we’ll transfer our sprouts from their yogurt containers to our backyard garden. While I know spring is here, I’m already looking forward to summer, and all those delicious vegetables our garden will produce.

One final note: This process was not without its flaws. My daughter, while helping to move the containers indoors, accidentally dropped the containers on the ground. We didn’t lose any seeds, but we did get the containers mixed up; as a result, we don’t know what’s in each one. We’ll find out which is which this summer when those sprouts become identifiable food; until then, it’ll be a mystery. So, a tip: if you decide to plant your own kitchen garden, use a marker to write on the container what’s inside. Or, be surprised. Either way, it’ll be delicious!

Disclosure: This post was created in partnership with Stonyfield. All opinions are my own.